The Book. The Mountain. Everything in between.

Posts tagged “beer

Timberline’s new Phlox Point Cabin

It’s not like Timberline needed anything to make it even more enjoyable, even more charming, even more appealing than it already is.

But this year, the lodge upped its attraction for the winter crowd with the addition of the Phlox Point Cabin.

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A former Boy Scout cabin that Timberline renovated last year, Phlox Point Cabin is the perfect place for a midday lunch, a warming spell on a chilly ski day or a mid-afternoon pick-me-up.

Amy and I made ourselves comfortable inside Phlox Point a few weeks ago when we marked the day we’d met 20 years ago in Clearwater Beach, Fla., with a ski day on a mountain thousands of miles away from those sandy shores.We’d skied for most of the morning, sans kiddos, and decided to break at the cabin for lunch. It was the right call, and the cabin and its offerings — tacos, IPAs, wine by the glass, a roasting fire inside and seating areas inside and out — are just about all you could ask for a mid-mountain hideaway.

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On Mount Hood in McMinnville — with Beer!

That’s right, with beer.

Last time I did an On Mount Hood book event in the cool little town of McMinnville, it was a quiet night in the bookstore there, Third Street Books.

This week as part of the McMinnville Public Library’s “Escape the Ordinary” summer reading series, I’ll be taking the book and some photos and stories to the Grain Station, a brew pub at 755 N.E. Alpine St. in McMinnville. I’ve not been to the joint yet, but it looks like a fine place for a pint of beer, maybe a pizza, and some Mount Hood on the side. It’ll be at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, July 16. See you there.

OMH Paperback cover


The Mount Hood pint glass is coming

By now, most people with an affinity for Mount Hood, beer and cool craftsmanship have heard about North Drinkware and its wildly popular and successful Oregon Pint.

The small Portland startup launched a modest Kickstarter campaign on Feb. 1, seeking $15,000 to kick off production of its handcrafted Oregon Pint glass, which features a topographically correct imprint of Mount Hood in its base.

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Courtesy North Drinkware

Five hours into its campaign, the goal had been met. A month later, when the campaign closed, backers had pledged more than a half-million dollars — $532,581 to be exact — and launched North Drinkware on a path to producing more than 13,000 glasses.

I’m a huge fan of Mount Hood, beer and cool craftsmanship, but I hesitated at the $35 price tag. Until, that is, I went and checked out one of the glasses for myself at MadeHerePDX, a Portland shop that features nothing but P-Town-made goods.

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With just a few days left in the campaign, I gave in, willingly, and picked up two Oregon Pints, one for me and one for my dad, who lives in Ohio but who’s spent some time on Hood, too. (He’s in On Mount Hood, as a matter of fact.)

The latest word from North is that the first round of pint glasses will likely start shipping at the end of this month, with another round scheduled for September. On their Facebook page, North notes in a short video that they’re currently in production and making headway.

A cool project — and a great story — for sure. And, even better for folks who maybe don’t have that affinity for Mount Hood but still appreciate fine craft beers, artistic skill and high places all over the country: North has plans to create glasses for other states and mountains in the not-too-distant future.

Cheers to that.

Courtesy North Drinkware

Courtesy North Drinkware


2013 Pickathon Pics

Another successful and memorable Pickathon has come and gone, though it lingers: the music, the people, the art, the food, the kids, the lighting, Marco Benevento’s 2 a.m. Monday morning set way up in the woods that seemed to be just warming up when we peeled away around 4.

I didn’t get any shots of the Mountain View Stage with Mount Hood this year, though there were times when the mountain rose off in the distance while great tunes happened right there. But Amy and I did capture a few moments from the weekend that help to share a little bit of what went on. Such fun…

The main stage at Pickathon 2013.

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Obligatory hula hoop shot.

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Lake Street Dive at the Pickathon Cafe. Nothing more to say.

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Spencer took ownership of this trail.

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A little artwork along the loop trail.

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New friends — and new boots — at Pickathon.

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I had to work during both of Dale Watson’s sets, and even though a highlight of Pickathon 2013 for me was volunteering, I was bummed to miss him and a few other acts.

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The rest of the crew got to see him and even meet him later on. Even signed Spence’s new ukulele. (A classic Madeline move below . . .)

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Speaking of the new ukulele…

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The kid busking thing has kind of become standard at Pickathon these days, but they still reeled in three bucks and some change.

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We had incredible burgers from Kuza Burger  — so good that we went back twice over the weekend — but we couldn’t resist giving the donut sliders from, I believe, Red Tomatoes, a try. Not as good as Kuza, but how to resist a cheeseburger served on a fresh-made donut?

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Rockin’ out with King Tufff after their daytime set . . .

King TuffAnd late night . . .

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Crashed out, filthy, and so content at the Woods Stage — kind of how most everyone feels after another great weekend at Pickathon.

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New Year’s on Mount Hood

Though I’ve not yet celebrated New Year’s on Mount Hood, I’ve always wanted to. The setting, the snow, the festivities, it all just seems very inviting.

We won’t be up on the mountain for the holiday again this year, but for anyone who might be, there’s plenty to choose from.

Timberline Lodge — The mountain’s landmark lodge ushers in the new year with style: two dinner seatings in its Cascade Dining Room, dancing, champagne toasts and more. There’s also late-night skiing and snowboarding on into 2013, and at midnight, a one-of-a-kind fireworks display:

Timberline Lodge Fireworks 1/01/2011Photo courtesy of Timberline Lodge

Mt. Hood Meadows — The ski area teams up with Widmer Brothers Brewing to ring in the new year with skiing and riding till midnight, a dinner buffet, live music from Keegan Smith and The Fam, and fireworks beginning at 10 p.m.

NewYearsEventPoster - smallMt. Hood Skibowl — For its 25th annual gala, Skibowl will be packing in skiing and riding till 2 a.m., Cosmic Tubing until midnight, two fireworks shows, DJs, live bands, the torchlight parade featuring the Powder Hounds snow bikers and Olympic speed skier Petr Kakes, champagne toasts, a Glow in the Dark Dance Party, and tons more.

Happy New Year!


Mountain brew — and view

After our hike to Tamawanas Falls over the weekend, we’d worked up a bit of a hunger and a thirst. Our  first stop was to Marchesi Vineyards, a charming little winery in Hood River, where we sampled a tasty pinot grigio and their 2010 primitivo, which is pretty much a zinfandel. Both were fantastic, as was the complimentary bread, cheese, and salami and the kid-friendly feel of the place.

For me, though, the ideal aprés-hike beverage  is always, hands-down, a fresh, cold IPA or pale ale. And when you’re hiking the north and east sides of Mount Hood and passing through Hood River on your way back home, you’re in the land of some great examples of both.

For years, the go-to was always Full Sail, and it’s still a consistent king in my book. Their menu has gotten much better over the years as well. Just down the street, Double Mountain Brewery & Taproom threw some variety into the mix  when they opened in 2007 with their Vaporizer, IRA and Hop Lava ales.  They offer some nice brick-oven pizzas and sandwiches, too.

This time, we branched out a little more, and headed over the river to Everybody’s Brewing, a characteristic brew pub I’d heard about in White Salmon. Like some of the other brewers out in the Gorge, Everybody’s Brewing brews ’em up right: Country Boy IPA, Boo Brah Bitter, Goodwill IPA, and others. They also serve up classic pub fare and have a front corner for live music, which was strumming away and adding nice color the night we were there.

There’s something else that sets Everybody’s Brewing apart from many of its compatriots out in the Gorge, too; something that makes the short drive across the bridge to White Salmon even more worth it than it already is:

That’s the view from their patio.

(Image courtesy of Everybody’s Brewing.)


Pickathon 2011

This weekend is Pickathon, the annual indie music festival that finds a few thousand music lovers out at a Happy Valley farm just outside of Portland for a three-day musical menagerie. Across five completely different stages, more than 35 bands and artists bring their divergent sounds and create some incredible moments. I wrote about one such moment at last year’s festival — a dark Saturday night when the Heartless Bastards took the main Mountain View Stage — for my friend, Tim Labarge’s, new book, Pickathonography, which he’s unveiling this weekend.

You never really know who’s going to create those moments and when, but among the folks I’ll be watching closely this weekend: Truckstop Darlin’, Black Mountain, The Buffalo Killers, Pine Leaf Boys, Corinne West & Kelly Joe Phelps, Sunday Valley, Jesse Sykes, Grupo Fantasma, Vetiver, The Sadies, and many, many others.

The music’s sounding great, the weather’s finally looking like beautiful summer, and the Pickathon vibe has been setting in all week. In anticipation of this year’s fest, a tiny little excerpt from On Mount Hood and a picture from last year’s Pickathon, both of which help to illustrate the mountain’s subtle yet undeniable connection to one of the best music festivals around.

From the Volcano chapter of the book, which talks all about the geology behind not only Mount Hood, but the entire region:

Farther from the mountain toward Portland, direct fallout from Hood’s past eruptions is less evident. But there is plenty around to keep the volcanism that built the mountain and the entire region close to people’s everyday thoughts. Portland landmarks like Powell Butte and Rocky Butte — a city dweller’s quick fix for climbing — all rose from vents in the Boring volcanic field less than a million years ago, when Hood was itself beginning to burble. Shooting a three-pointer on the court at Mount Tabor Park, a characteristic Portland gem, puts you squarely on top of the vent that built the 643-foot cinder cone of the same name. And if ever in early August you head to the Pendarvis Farm in Happy Valley, just outside southeast Portland, for the fantastic three-day music festival known as Pickathon, you’ll be swaying to the tunes on the eastern flanks of Mount Scott, an extinct volcano named for Harvey Scott, editor of The Oregonian in 1889. 

And from last year’s festival, a shot that shows just why it’s called the Mountain View stage:

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Head for the mountains

Just as there is great food to be had around Mount Hood, so too are there great beers.

Certainly, just about anything hits the spot after an all-night climb, a three-day backpack, or even a lazy day on the Muddy Fork of the Sandy River. But when discretion is yours, there are plenty of fantastic, locally-made brews available to render mass-produced swill entirely irrelevant.

A few favorites:

Hood River’s stalwart brewery — and the third-largest in Oregon — Full Sail has always been a favorite for post-hike unwinding on the north side of the mountain. (I profiled the brewery’s founder and CEO in 2010 too.) There was a time when the only reason to visit this scenic brewery and pub overlooking the Columbia River was the beer — no real problem with that — but they’ve since renovated the pub and broadened the menu, upping the ante. I’ve long been partial to their hoppy and refreshing IPA, but their Session lager, in its stubby 11 oz bottles, is great for river days, and Wassail is one of the best holiday brews every yuletide season.

A little pricey at times up on the mountain, Mt. Hood Brewing Co. nonetheless brews a few fine beers, namely their Ice Axe IPA. And not only does a pint taste even better when you score a window seat in the Ram’s Head Bar with a clear view of Mount Hood just outside, but their old-school logos and alpine-inspired names — Hogsback Oatmeal Stout for one — make Mt Hood Brewing’s just the right kind of libations for the mountain.

Now in its fourth year, Double Mountain Brewery in Hood River makes a heavy IPA — Hop Lava — and they fire a great pizza. Even better: this small brewery’s beers are on tap at its Hood River pub, at more than two dozen local establishments, and at more than 100 places in the Portland metro region.


Sustenance

Over the years, we’ve spent a lot of time on Mount Hood, but also a fair amount of time driving to and from and around it. And so, after long hikes up to McNeil Point, afternoons climbing at French’s Dome, long, scenic drives around the Mount Hood loop with out-of-towners, and day trips to canoe, ski, sled, or just visit, we’ve sampled a few of the local restaurants and watering holes around the mountain. Some have been forgettable, others have become go-to favorites. A few of the latter to consider next time you’re in the area:

Calamity Jane’s Hamburger Parlor 

Calamity JaneAnyone who’s driven by Calamity Jane’s in Sandy on their way to or from the mountain and not been at least intrigued to know what that inviting blond with the burger on the side of the road is really all about must have been asleep at the wheel. We pulled in years ago to check it out, and now no hike under 5 miles ends without a Calamity burger on the tail end. The place is homey and traditional, the menu packed with close to 40 burgers served in three different scales: the third-pound City Slicker, the two-thirds-pound Wrangler, and the just plain scary one-pounder known as the Trail Boss. Some of the burgers sound more novelty than anything —the George Washington has sour cream and pie cherries — but paired with fries and giant 34 0z Bridgeport IPAs, just about anything from Calamity’s caps off a day on the mountain in a satiating, near gut-busting way.

El Burro Loco

El Burro LocoThere came a time when it seemed as if we were running out of options for better food around the mountain. But then someone recommended El Burro Loco in Welches, and that changed that. Unassuming but friendly, this Mexican joint has fantastic, reasonably priced food, a huge beer selection — at least five different IPAs on tap last time we stopped in — and chummy staff. Great for when you’ve not earned a Calamity burger but still want some real satisfaction.

 3 Rivers Grill 

When you’re not rewarding yourself for a long and dirty day on the trail but instead seeking out a touch more refinery, 3 Rivers Grill,  on the north side of the mountain in Hood River, makes an excellent choice. A little more upscale but still laced with Oregon informality, 3 Rivers sits high on a hill lot in downtown overlooking the city and the Columbia River. Outside seating is scenic and comfortable, and the salmon I had there on our first visit was something I’ve not soon forgotten.

Of course, there are a ton of other options, including breweries, pizza joints, historic lodges, and even a renowned donut shop. But this site is new. We’ve much to cover. And we will.